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Cd live linux gparted

Live CD/USB/PXE/HD

GParted Live is a small bootable GNU/Linux distribution for x86 based computers.
It enables you to use all the features of the latest versions of the GParted application.

GParted Live can be installed on CD, USB, PXE server, and Hard Disk then run on an x86 machine.

CAUTION: Creating a whole disk or partition image backup is recommended before you resize or move a partition. Some free software (GPL) disk and partition image tools are available:

Installation Instructions

To install GParted Live on CD, download the .iso file and burn it as an image to a CD.

Usage Instructions

See the GParted Live Manual for instructions on how to use the Live image.
See the GParted Manual for instructions on how to use the application for partitioning tasks.
See the documentation page for copies of the GParted Manual in other languages.

Accounts in GParted live

GParted live is based on Debian live, and the default account is “user”, with password “live”. There is no root password, so if you need root privileges, login as “user”, then run “sudo” to get root privileges.

Available boot parameters

You can find the available boot parameters for GParted live here.

Included Packages

GParted Live includes additional packages, such as:

Graphical Utilities

Right click on the desktop to access a pop-up menu.

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GParted Live on USB

The bootable GParted Live image can also be installed on a USB flash drive.

Following are instructions on how to setup GParted Live on your USB flash drive using either MS Windows or GNU/Linux.

NOTE: These installation methods only work when the USB flash drive is formatted with a FAT file system. Some users have reported that only the FAT16 file system worked for them. For other file systems you might try to use grub or some other boot loader.

USB setup with Windows

Choose one of the following methods to setup GParted Live on your USB flash drive using MS Windows:

Windows Method A: Tuxboot

  1. Download Tuxboot on your MS Windows computer.
  2. Follow the USB setup with MS Windows instructions to install GParted Live on your USB flash drive.

Windows Method B: Manual

WARNING! DO NOT RUN makeboot.bat from your local hard drive!
Doing so could cause your MS windows not to boot.

  1. Download the GParted Live zip file.
  2. If you already have a partition of at least 300 MB in size on your USB flash drive formatted with a FAT file system then skip to the next step (3).

Otherwise create at least a 300 MB partition on your USB flash drive and format it with a FAT16 or FAT32 file system.
The partition must be large enough to hold the extracted contents of the GParted Live zip file.

  • Extract all the contents of the zip file to FAT16/FAT32 partition on your USB flash drive. Keep the directory architecture, for example, file “GPL” should be in the USB flash drive’s top directory (e.g. G:\GPL).
  • Browse to your USB flash drive and as an administrator (On the USB flash key, create a shortcut to the makeboot.bat file. Then right-clic on the shortcut, Properties, Advanced and check “Run as administrator”.), click the makeboot.bat in the dir utils\win32\. WARNING! Makeboot.bat must be run from your USB flash drive.
  • Follow the on-screen instructions.
    (PS: The above description is modified from: http://www.pendrivelinux.com/2007/01/02/all-in-one-usb-dsl. Thanks to PDLA from http://pendrivelinux.com)

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    Windows Method C: Unetbootin

    CAUTION: Unetbootin creates a different boot menu.
    Therefore it is recommended to use method A or B.

    1. If you already have Unetbootin installed on your computer then skip to the next step (2).
      Otherwise download and install Unetbootin on your MS Windows computer.
    2. Download the GParted Live iso file.
    3. From Windows, run the Unetbootin program and follow the instructions in the GUI to install GParted Live on your USB flash drive.

    Windows Method D: LinuxLive USB Creator

    1. If you already have LinuxLive USB Creator installed on your computer then skip to the next step (2).
      Otherwise download and install LinuxLive USB Creator on your MS Windows computer.
    2. Download the GParted Live iso file.
    3. From Windows, install then run the LinuxLive USB Creator program and follow the instructions in the GUI to install GParted Live on your USB flash drive.

    USB setup with GNU/Linux

    Choose one of the following methods to setup GParted Live on your USB flash drive using GNU/Linux:

    GNU/Linux Method A: Tuxboot

    1. Download Tuxboot on your GNU/Linux computer.
    2. Follow the USB setup with GNU/Linux instructions to install GParted Live on your USB flash drive.

    GNU/Linux Method B: Manual

    WARNING! Confirm you have the correct path name before executing commands!
    Failure to do so could cause loss of data or your GNU/Linux not to boot.
    /dev/sde is a device path name
    /dev/sde1 is a partition path name

    1. Download the GParted Live zip file.
    2. If you already have a FAT16 or FAT32 partition on your USB flash drive then skip to the next step (3).

    Otherwise prepare at least a 300 MB partition formatted with either a FAT16 or FAT32 file system.
    The partition must be large enough to hold the extracted contents of the GParted Live zip file.

    If the USB flash drive or USB hard drive does not have any partition, you can use a partitioning tool (e.g. gparted, parted, fdisk, cfdisk or sfdisk) to create a partition with a size of 300 MB or more.
    Here we assume your USB flash drive or USB hard drive is /dev/sdd ( You have to comfirm your device name, since it’s _NOT_ always /dev/sdd ) on your GNU/Linux, so the partition table is like: Then format the partition as FAT with a command such as “mkfs.vfat -F 32 /dev/sdd1”
    WARNING! Executing the mkfs.vfat command on the wrong partition or device could cause your GNU/Linux not to boot. Be sure to confirm the command before you run it.

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  • Insert your USB flash drive or USB hard drive into the USB port on your Linux machine and wait a few seconds. Next, run the command “dmesg” to query the device name of the USB flash drive or USB hard drive. Let’s say, for example, that you find it is /dev/sdd1. In this example, we assume /dev/sdd1 has FAT filesystem, and it is automatically mounted in dir /media/usb/. If it’s not automatically mounted, manually mount it with commands such as “mkdir -p /media/usb; mount /dev/sdd1 /media/usb/”.
  • Unzip all the files and copy them into your USB flash drive or USB hard drive. You can do this with a command such as: “unzip gparted-live-0.4.5-2.zip -d /media/usb/”). Keep the directory architecture, for example, file “GPL” should be in the USB flash drive or USB hard drive’s top directory (e.g. /media/usb/GPL).
  • To make your USB flash drive bootable, first change the working dir, e.g. “cd /media/usb/utils/linux”, then run “bash makeboot.sh /dev/sdd1” ( replace /dev/sdd1 with your USB flash drive device name ), and follow the prompts.
    WARNING! Executing makeboot.sh with the wrong device name could cause your GNU/Linux not to boot. Be sure to confirm the command before you run it.

    NOTE: There is a known problem if you run makeboot.sh on Debian Etch, since the program utils/linux/syslinux does not work properly. Make sure you run it on newer GNU/Linux, such as Debian Lenny, Ubuntu 8.04, or Fedora 9.

    TIP: If your USB flash drive or USB hard drive is not able to boot, check the following:

    • Ensure that your USB flash drive contains at least one FAT partition.
    • Ensure that the partition is marked as “bootable” in the partition table.
    • Ensure that the partition starts on a cylinder boundary.
      For the first partition this is usually sector 63.

    GNU/Linux Method C: Unetbootin

    CAUTION: Unetbootin creates a different boot menu.
    Therefore it is recommended to use method A or B.

    1. If you already have Unetbootin installed on your computer then skip to step 2.
      Otherwise install Unetbootin on your GNU/Linux computer.
    2. Download the GParted Live iso file.
    3. From GNU/Linux, run the Unetbootin program and follow the instructions in the GUI to install GParted Live on your USB flash drive.

    GNU/Linux Method D: Manual – Overwrite

    WARNING: Confirm you have the correct device path name before executing commands!

    This method will overwrite the destination device. Hence it is critical to select the proper USB flash device.

    Since GParted Live is based on Debian Live and this image is a isohybrid, the GParted Live CD image can be written directly to a USB flash drive.

    1. Download the GParted Live iso file.
    2. Insert the USB flash drive your Linux computer and wait a few seconds. Next, from a terminal window run the command:

    dmesg

    This command queries the device name of the USB flash drive. For example, you might find the device name is /dev/sde.
    From a terminal window, enter the following command using the gparted .iso file name and USB device path you discoved in the previous steps.
    For example:

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    Downloads

    GParted is a free partition manager that enables you to resize, copy, and move partitions without data loss.

    The best way to access all of the features of the GParted application is by using the GParted Live bootable image. GParted Live enables you to use GParted on GNU/Linux as well as other operating systems, such as Windows or Mac OS X.

    CAUTION: Editing partitions has the potential to cause LOSS of DATA.
    You are advised to BACKUP your DATA before using gparted.

    Download Links

    If you use GParted and it helps you with your task, then please consider making a donation to help us make GParted better.

    NOTE: GParted Live is available in three different architectures

    Architecture Description
    i686 32-bit version runs on x86 and x86-64 based computers, limited to physical address space of 4 gigabytes, and uses one processor only.
    If in doubt, try this one first.
    i686-PAE 32-bit version runs on x86 (i686 and higher) and x86-64 based computers, with Physical Address Extension to access more than 4 gigabytes of memory, and supports use of multiple processor cores.
    amd64 64-bit version runs on x86-64 based computers, with ability to access more than 4 gigabytes of memory, and supports use of multiple processor cores.
    For newer (>2010) computers with UEFI instead of legacy BIOS try this one.
  • GParted Live CD/USB/HD/PXE Bootable Image
    Stable Releases
    Download gparted-live-1.1.0-5-i686.iso

    Stable directory (.iso/.zip)
    (for i686, i686-pae and amd64 architectures)

    Release notes Changelog Checksums
    Checksums.gpg
    (Signed by GParted live maintainer Steven Shiau, updated on Sep/18/2017), or available on the 2nd key server.
    Testing Releases
    Testing directory (.iso/.zip)
    (for i686, i686-pae and amd64 architectures)
    Release notes and checksums in same directory.

    GParted Application Source Code
    Source code directory (.tar.gz) Release notes and checksums in same directory.

    Linux Distribution * Package Command Prompt Install
    Debian gparted
    Fedora gparted
    Mageia gparted
    OpenSUSE gparted
    Ubuntu gparted

    * NOTE: Distribution packages might not contain the most recent versions of GParted.

    TIP: Problems booting GParted Live image? See Tips on Booting GParted Live.

    Order GParted Live on CD, USB flash drive, or SD Card

    GParted Live can be ordered on a CDROM, USB flash drive, or SD card and delivered to you by postal mail.
    Before ordering please check that it is the version you want.

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